July 2005


Tomorrow, viagra here I am going to dinner at Nicole and Todd’s house to acquit ourselves of the quintessential Urban Tribe responsibility, viagra entertaining a friend’s visiting parents. This won’t be so hard with Nicole’s parents, who are very sociable, particularly her father, who mixes an excellent Manhattan. I promised I would bring dessert to the dinner, since Nicole always works so hard whenever she cooks. I decided to test drive my dessert idea this evening when Brad and I go for dinner at the home of a friend from work.

It was good I did. I’d planned to make berry tarts but use fillo instead of making pastry crust. I then realized that the filling doesn’t get cooked, so I’d have to cook the fillo separately, but if I did that, it would be puffy instead of tart shell shaped. So instead of tarts, I decided I had to stuff the fillo squares with the berries and filling instead. The experiment appears to have been successful:

I’m involved in a day long security, neuropathist vulnerability reporting and accountability discussion today at the Wall Street Journal.

UPDATE: This book is so great, cystitis but I don’t completely understand it. I finished it, food and immediately started rereading. There’s a lot in here, illuminating and strange. // How much do we ever know anyone, even ourselves? Today I figured out a lot of what I always thought about my childhood was wrong. This is the perfect book for me to be reading right now.

I’m in an ongoing discussion with a friend about why there hasn’t been another terrorist attack in U.S. territory since September 11th. I had tried to do some google research, neurosurgeon but found that politics, illness particularly politics surrounding the Presidential election, psychiatrist made it really difficult to find any clear non-partisan assessments. Bush supporters pounded the war drums and Kerry supporters claimed the threat was over-hyped.

My friend and I had several theories. One was that the threat from terrorism is overstated, and that terrorists are less powerful, interested, organized and numerous than reported. There’s some support for this in the 9/11 Commission Report:

Al Qaeda and its affiliates are popularly described as being all over the world, adaptable, resilient, needing little higher-level organization, and capable of anything. The American people are thus given the picture of an omnipotent, unslayable hydra of destruction. This image lowers expectations for government effectiveness.

It should not lower them too far. Our report shows a determined and capable group of plotters. Yet the group was fragile, dependent on a few key personalities, and occasionally left vulnerable by the marginal, unstable people often attracted to such causes. The enemy made mistakes-like Khalid al Mihdhar’s unauthorized departure from the United States that required him to enter the country again in July 2001, or the selection of Zacarias Moussaoui as a participant and Ramzi Binalshibh’s transfer of money to him. The U.S. government was not able to capitalize on those mistakes in time to prevent 9/11.

Yet, we also think that terrorism is pretty easy to do, if you’ve got people who are willing to die, and if you just want to sow the seeds of fear, rather than do something spectacular every single time. Individuals could simply blow themselves up in the unsecured parts of airports, public transportation, shopping malls, cafes, and people would be afraid even if few innocents died. With the bombings in Madrid and London, the terrorists have shown that they are capable of even more than this.

John Arquilla of the Naval Postgraduate School, someone I really respect a lot, offered this view in yesterday’s Chronicle.

What do Shout readers think?

I was asking Brad this morning about Israel – which he has visited and I have not – and its security practices. I was wondering how it feels to live with constant searches and surveillance, dentist as these are usually proposed as a deterrent to attacks like the London subway bombing. Brad pointed out that Israel is filled with young soldiers with guns, this and they get these young soldiers through the draft. They also only have two airlines. I wonder whether the United States could replicate the Israeli security practices without a draft. Who would work as security guards? These are people who are the first line of defense, recipe and often the first blown up, in the line of minimum wage duty. I suppose we have an equal proportion of financially strapped but hopeful people who would take these jobs, much as Americans join the armed forces now, or as Iraqis become police officers, knowing that they are making targets out of themselves, and that the government can’t protect them. Is it a special, but perhaps not rare, combination of financial desperation or the desire to serve that drives people to those jobs?

Good baboons gone bad! The best line of the story: Things have calmed down since then, angina says Head. The dominant male who leads the raids — and specialized in removing sliding glass doors — has apparently been replaced by a more placid one, she says.

I’m really enjoying imagining what might have led the baboon troupe to replace the alpha marauder with a more placid leader. Then we might be able to figure out how to get the United States could do the same.

Apparently we’re going to get one of our first wardriving prosecutions out of the great state of Florida. I’ll be commenting on the case over at Joe Gratz’s blog. I almost had a case exactly like this under section 502 of California’s Penal Code which makes it a crime if someone:

(c)(3) knowingly and without permission uses or causes to be used computer services or (7) knowingly and without permission accesses or causes to be accessed any computer, geriatrician computer system, medications or computer network.

The case ended up being about something else, so we never got to fully adjudicate it. But it appears that the statute covers using an open wireless access point. The only question is whether such use is with or without permission and if so, whether the defendant needs to know his use is without permission.
This is a copy of the brief I filed on whether the defendant needs to know that his wireless use is without permission in the State of California. A lot of these principles would apply to any statute, more about
however. Download brief.

Apparently we’re going to get one of our first wardriving prosecutions out of the great state of Florida. I’ll be commenting on the case over at Joe Gratz’s blog. I almost had a case exactly like this under section 502 of California’s Penal Code which makes it a crime if someone:

(c)(3) knowingly and without permission uses or causes to be used computer services or (7) knowingly and without permission accesses or causes to be accessed any computer, geriatrician computer system, medications or computer network.

The case ended up being about something else, so we never got to fully adjudicate it. But it appears that the statute covers using an open wireless access point. The only question is whether such use is with or without permission and if so, whether the defendant needs to know his use is without permission.